It is no secret that California’s wage-hour laws are complex and often raise questions that employers, employees and the courts struggle with. As we wrote here more than a year ago, faced with questions regarding California’s ambiguous “day of rest” laws, the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals threw up its hands and asked the California Supreme Court to clarify those laws.

Among the questions to be answered was one that impacts a great many employers, particularly those in the retail and hospitality industries – does the requirement that an employee be provided a “day of rest” apply to each workweek (such that an employee could be scheduled to work 12 consecutive days over two workweeks), or does it apply to each rolling, 7-day period (such that employees could never be scheduled to work more than 6 consecutive days)?

Employers have been awaiting the Supreme Court’s decision, not just because it could require them to change their scheduling practices, but because an adverse interpretation of the “day of rest” laws could lead to a great many lawsuits and exposure over past practices.

The California Supreme Court issued its opinion in Mendoza v. Nordstrom, Inc. on Monday.  And the Court’s answers to the Ninth Circuit’s questions are ones that should please most employers.

Perhaps most importantly, the Supreme Court concluded that “a day of rest is guaranteed for each work week,” not for each rolling, 7-day period – a conclusion that would allow an employer to schedule an employee to work for as many as 12 consecutive days without violating the law (so long as the employee is not required to work 7 in one workweek).

The California answered the Ninth Circuit’s questions as follows:

  1. With regard to California Labor Code section 551, which  provides that “[e]very person employed in any occupation of labor is entitled to one day’s rest therefrom in seven,” is the required day of rest calculated by the workweek, or is it calculated on a rolling basis for any consecutive 7-day period?

As the Ninth Circuit Court noted, this question was no mere matter of semantics. One answer would lead to liability for the employer, while the other would not.

Reviewing the “manifestly ambiguous” statutory language and legislative history, the California Supreme Court concluded, “A day of rest is guaranteed for each workweek. Periods of more than six consecutive days of work that stretch across more than one workweek are not per se prohibited.”

The Court explained, “The Legislature intended to ensure employees, as conducive to their health and well-being, a day of rest each week, not to prevent them from ever working more than six consecutive days at any one time.”

  1. With regard to California Labor Code section 556, which exempts employers from providing such a day of rest when the total hours of employment do not exceed 30 hours in any week or six hours in “any” one day thereof, does the exemption apply when an employee works less than six hours in any one day of the applicable week, or does it apply only when an employee works less than six hours in each day of the week?

As the Ninth Circuit noted, the word “any” could support either interpretation. And, again, this was not a matter of semantics. The different interpretations of “any” would lead to very different liability determinations.

The California Supreme Court concluded, “The exemption for employees working shifts of six hours or less applies only to those who never exceed six hours of work on any day of the workweek. If on any one day an employee works more than six hours, a day of rest must be provided during that workweek, subject to whatever other exceptions might apply.”

  1. With regard to California Labor Code section 552, which provides that an employer may not “cause” his employees to work more than six days in seven, what does the word “cause” mean? Does it mean “force, coerce, pressure, schedule, encourage, reward, permit, or something else?”

Again, the different interpretations of “cause” would lead to different liability determinations.

The California Supreme Court concluded, “An employer causes its employee to go without a day of rest when it induces the employee to forgo rest to which he or she is entitled. An employer is not, however, forbidden from permitting or allowing an employee, fully apprised of the entitlement to rest, independently to choose not to take a day of rest.”

The California Supreme Court’s answers to these questions – particularly the first and third – will likely be greeted with much relief from employers in California, especially in the retail and hospitality industries where it is not uncommon to schedule employees to work 7 days or more in a row with shifts of varying lengths, and where employees may often swap shifts with each other such that they are working seven days or more in a row.

By Jeffrey Ruzal

President Obama has spent much of his second term zealously pursuing an increase to the current $7.25 federal minimum hourly wage. While it is not clear whether a federal wage hike is in the offing, many states have recently taken measures to increase their own minimum wage rates. Effective January 1, 2014, Arizona, Colorado, Connecticut, Florida, Missouri, Montana, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Oregon, Rhode Island, Vermont and Washington have all increased their minimum wage rates. There are also five additional states, California, Delaware, Michigan, Minnesota, West Virginia, plus the District of Columbia, which have passed legislation for future minimum wage increases that will take effect in 2014.

Employers, especially ones which operate in multiple states, must be vigilant in monitoring and planning for future state minimum wages increases. What is more, employers in specific industries, such as hospitality, must consider additional compliance measures, including changes in the maximum tip credit an employer may take against its tipped employees’ hourly wages.

The chart below provides each state’s previous and current minimum wage and maximum tip credit rates, as well as scheduled future increases through the end of 2014.

State

Previous Minimum Wage

Current Minimum Wage

Future Minimum Wage Increases in 2014

Previous Tip Credit

Current Tip Credit

Arizona

$7.80

$7.90

(effective 1/1/14)

$4.80

$4.90

(eff. 1/1/14)

California

$8.00

$9.00

(eff. 7/1/14)

No tip credit permitted

Colorado

$7.78

$8.00

(eff. 1/1/14)

$4.76

$4.98

(eff. 1/1/14)

Connecticut

$8.25

$8.70

(eff. 1/1/14)

$7.34 for bartenders; $5.69 all other tipped employees

Delaware

$7.25

$7.75

(eff. 6/1/14)

$2.23

D.C.

$8.25

$9.50

(eff. 7/1/14)

$2.77

Florida

$7.79

$7.93

(eff. 1/1/14)

$4.77

$4.91

(eff. 1/1/14)

Michigan

$7.40

$8.15

(eff. 9/1/14)

$2.65

Minnesota

$6.15 for employers w/ annual sales >$625,000; $5.25 for employers w/ < $625,000

$8.00 for employers w/ annual sales >$500,000; $6.50 for employers w/ < $500,000

(eff. 8/1/14)

$6.15 for employers w/ annual sales >$625,000; $5.25 for employers w/ < $625,000

Missouri

$7.35

$7.50

(eff. 1/1/14)

$3.68

$3.75

(eff. 1/1/14)

Montana

$7.80

$7.90

(eff. 1/1/14)

No tip credit permitted

New Jersey

$7.25

$8.25

(eff. 1/1/14)

$2.13

No change in tip credit

New York

$7.25

$8.00

(eff.12/31/13)

$8.75

(eff.12/31/14)

$5.00 for food service employees; $5.65 for service employees (delivery and coat check)

No change in tip credit

Ohio

$7.85

$7.95

(eff. 1/1/14)

$3.93

$3.98

(eff. 1/1/14)

Oregon

$8.95

$9.10

(eff. 1/1/14)

No tip credit permitted

Rhode Island

$7.75

$8.00

(eff. 1/1/14)

$2.89

No change in tip credit

Vermont

$8.60

$8.73

(eff. 1/1/14)

$4.17

$4.23

(eff. 1/1/14)

Washington

$9.19

$9.32

(eff. 1/1/14)

No tip credit permitted

West Virginia

$7.25

$8.00

(eff.12/31/14)

$5.80

By:  Kara M. Maciel

The Department of Labor’s Wage and Hour Division in Norfolk, Virginia has announced that it will be stepping up its compliance audits and enforcement efforts against area hotels. In the past few years, the DOL stated it found violations at about 60% of local hotels. According to the DOL, the agency recently made spot checks at 10 area hotels since April. This is just one part of the agency’s nationwide enforcement program and its “Plan/Prevent/Protect” initiative against the hospitality industry. Common violations assessed by the DOL include:

·         Payment of overtime. Under the FLSA, employees are entitled to overtime for any hours worked over 40 per week. For employers who have multiple hotels or facilities, when employees work at different locations in a work week, it is imperative that the employer coordinate its payroll systems to aggregate the employee’s time worked at both jobs in order to ensure that proper overtime is being paid. The DOL is finding that when an employee works at one hotel 20 hours per week, and 25 hours at another hotel, the employee is not paid overtime.   

·         Unlawful deductions. Many hospitality employers require employees to reimburse the hotel for a uniform through payroll deductions. However, an employer may not lawfully deduct from an employee’s wages for the cost of a uniform if it reduces the employee’s hourly wage below the minimum wage. Thus, for employees who are paid the minimum wage or tipped employees for whom the employer takes the tip credit, the hotel cannot deduct for a uniform if it drops the employee below the minimum wage.     

·         Working through meal breaks. Another common violation in the hospitality industry relates to workplaces in which the employer voluntarily provides a meal break. Under the FLSA, an employee, who is provided with a bona fide meal break, must be completely relieved of duty.  If an employee clocks out for lunch, and then is asked to clock back in to perform some work, the employee must be paid for the entire meal break, and not just for the time back on the clock. For many employers who automatically deduct for meal breaks or who fail to pay for the full meal period when it is interrupted, this could represent a significant liability. 

Now, more than ever, employers in the hospitality industry should be vigilant in their wage and hour compliance with federal and state law. Especially in light of the DOL’s recent roll-out of its Smartphone “app,” which allows workers to track their hours and evaluate the amount of overtime earned, workers are being armed with ample resources to bring claims of unpaid wage against the employers. 

By Amy J. Traub

The New York State Department of Labor recently issued a proposed rule which would combine the current wage orders for the restaurant and hotel industries to form a single Minimum Wage Order for the Hospitality Industry.  If adopted, the Wage Order would affect requirements related to the minimum wage, tip credits and pooling, customer service charges, allowances, overtime calculations, and other common issues within the restaurant and hotel industries.  Additionally, the Wage Order would provide helpful guidance for traditionally ambiguous wage issues such as the handling of service charges and the definition of an employee uniform for purposes of a laundry allowance.  Highlights of the Wage Order include:

·         Minimum Wage (Effective January 1, 2011) 

o       Food service workers would need to receive at least $5.00 per hour and no more than $2.25 per hour in tip credits; however, the total of tips they receive plus their hourly wages would need to amount to $7.25 per hour

o       Service employees (at non-resort hotels) would need to receive at least $5.65 per hour and no more than $1.60 per hour in tip credits; however, the total of tips they receive plus their hourly wages would need to amount to $7.25 per hour

o       Service employees (resort hotel employees) would need to receive at least $4.90 per hour and no more than $2.35 per hour in tip credits; however their weekly average for tips would need to be at least $4.10 per hour 

 

·         Notifications to Employees and Customers 

o       Prior to beginning employment, employers now would need to notify employees that they are taking a tip credit from their wages

o       Employers would need to notify employees of any changes to their hourly rate of pay

o       Employers would need to notify customers of any charge that is neither for food/beverage nor a gratuity to a service employee; for example, a banquet or special function charge 

 

·         No More Set-Off of Wages Paid in Excess of Minimum Wage 

o       Employers would need to pay an additional hour at the rate of minimum wage for each hour the employee works beyond 10 hours per day, regardless of whether the rate of pay for the first 10 hours is above the minimum wage

 

·         No More Salary for Non-Exempt Employees 

o       Currently, a non-exempt employee can still be paid a salary so long as he/she is paid one and one-half times the regular rate of pay for hours worked beyond 40 hours during the week

o       If adopted, the Wage Order would require that all non-exempt workers (except commissioned salespersons) are paid on an hourly basis 

 

·         Tip Pooling 

o       Employers could require food service workers to join a tip pool

o       This would not apply to employees who do not provide direct food service to customers (however, a host/hostess who seats guests would be considered a direct food service employee and therefore eligible to participate in a tip pool) 

 

·         Increased Guidance 

o       Employers would be able to retain service charges if, and only if, they clearly explain to customers that such charges are not distributed to service employees

o       The Wage Order would exclude from the definition of “uniform” any clothing that may be worn as part of an employee’s wardrobe outside of work

o       Employers would not need to reimburse employees for the laundry expenses of any uniform clothing that can be washed with the employee’s non-uniform clothing; for example, a uniform that does not require dry cleaning

The new Wage Order signifies the New York State Department of Labor’s attempt to simplify the wage and hour rules for the restaurant and hotel industries while stepping up its enforcement of overtime and deduction violations, particularly with respect to non-exempt employees who are currently paid a salary as opposed to an hourly wage.   Of course, these highlighted changes are only a portion of the changes that would come into effect in the event the Wage Order is adopted in its entirety.