As many will recall, the Department of Labor’s (“DOL”) overtime rule, increasing the salary threshold for overtime exemptions at the behest of the Obama administration, was scheduled to take effect on December 1, 2016. Months later, it remains in limbo before the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeal. And it apparently will remain in limbo for at least several more months.

After publication of the final overtime rule on May 23, 2016, two lawsuits were filed by a coalition of 21 states and a number of business advocacy groups, claiming that the DOL exceeded its rulemaking authority in finalizing the overtime rule. The lawsuits, which were consolidated, sought a variety of relief, including a preliminary injunction blocking the overtime rule from taking effect.

Days before the final rule went into effect, the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Texas granted Plaintiffs’ motion and issued a nationwide preliminary injunction. Prior to President Trump’s inauguration, the Department of Labor appealed the order to the Fifth Circuit. Thereafter, the DOL was granted two extensions of time to consider whether it wished to proceed with the appeal.

The most recent extension was set to expire on May 1, 2017 . Now, the DOL has requested – and the Fifth Circuit has granted – yet another 60-day extension because Secretary of Labor nominee Alexander Acosta has not yet been confirmed. In granting the extension, the Fifth Circuit continued the DOL’s deadline to file its reply brief to June 30, 2017.

This most recent extension will give additional time to the DOL to evaluate its options, which includes abandoning the appeal and any further efforts to implement and enforce the overtime rule. It is important to keep in mind, however, that even though Secretary of Labor Nominee Acosta does not appear to support the Obama administration’s plan to more than double the salary threshold, he has expressed opinions that suggest he would support updating the overtime rule to some degree, possibly increasing the salary threshold to mirror inflation. It is also important to be mindful that certain states, including New York and California, have a higher minimum salary threshold than the current federal requirement of $455 per week. We will continue to monitor and report on this important matter as it develops.

By: Jeffrey M. Landes and Susan Gross Sholinsky

The presentation slides and the recording for the webinar – Creating and Maintaining a Lawful Internship Program – are now accessible for your viewing. If you would like to review, please contact Kiirsten Lederer to obtain instructions.

During this timely and important webinar, we discussed how to minimize both your organization’s liability and the risk of wage and hour lawsuits. Specifically, participants walked away with answers to the following questions:

  • What are the best practices for recruiting and hiring interns, and what critical language should you include (or avoid) in offer letters, employment contracts, and other communications?
  • What assignments are appropriate for interns, and what tasks must you prevent interns from doing?
  • How does the Fair Labor Standards Act apply to interns?
  • What is the best way to handle various forms of remuneration (money, academic credit, company discounts, etc.) for interns?
  • How do the rules of for-profit and non-profit companies differ (and what rules apply to public-sector employers)?
  • How do child labor laws affect internships?
  • What are best practices for organizations—before, during and after an internship program?
  • Do company policies apply to interns?
  • What rules should you consider if you would like to hire an intern on a full-time basis in the future?
  • When does workers’ compensation or other insurance kick in, and how should you handle unemployment insurance?
  • What common blunders should you avoid when setting up school internship programs?
  • What ethical considerations apply when creating an internship program?

We look forward to your participation in future EBG educational programs. Please click here for a list of upcoming webinars/events that may be of interest to you or your colleagues.

By: Michael S. Kun

My colleagues have a new post on the Retail Labor and Employment Law blog that will help many of our readers at this time of year: “Summer’s Coming! How to Handle Unpaid Internships,” by Jeffrey M. Landes, Susan Gross Sholinsky, and Nancy L. Gunzenhauser.

Following is an excerpt:

A hot topic for every summer – but particularly this summer – is the status of unpaid interns. You are probably aware that several wage and hour lawsuits have been brought regarding the employment status of unpaid interns, particularly in the entertainment and publishing industries. The theory behind these cases is that the interns in question don’t fall within the “trainee” exception to the definition of “employee” under the federal Fair Labor Standards Act (“FLSA”), as well as applicable state laws. If the intern does fall within this exception, he or she is not subject to wage and hour laws (such as minimum wage or overtime) and the unpaid internship is thus permissible.

Read the full post here.

In a complimentary webinar on May 22 (1:00 p.m. ET), our colleagues Jeffrey M. Landes and Susan Gross Sholinsky will present a webinar on how to strategically structure internship programs to comply with applicable wage and hour guidelines.

Join us for a discussion on how to minimize both your organization’s liability and the risk of wage and hour lawsuits. In particular, below are just a few of the many questions we will address during the webinar:

  • What are the best practices for recruiting and hiring seasonal interns, and what critical language should you include (or avoid) in offer letters, employment contracts, and other communications?
  • How can you make appropriate assignments during the internship, and what must you prevent summer interns from doing?
  • How does the Fair Labor Standards Act apply to summer interns?
  • What is the best way to handle various forms of remuneration (money, academic credit, company discounts, etc.) for interns?

Click here to read more about this webinar, or click here to register.