Wage and Hour Defense Blog

Wage and Hour Defense Blog

Tag Archives: meal periods

California Court of Appeal Reverses Previous Decision and Affirms the Use of Second Meal Period Waivers for Health Care Employers

Kevin SullivanA little more than two years ago, we wrote about how a California Court of Appeal’s decision exposed health care employers to litigation if they relied upon IWC Wage Order 5 for meal period waivers. That decision was Gerard v. Orange Coast Memorial Medical Center (“Gerard I”), where the Court of Appeal concluded that IWC Wage Order 5 was partially invalid to the extent it authorized second meal period waivers on shifts over 12 hours. Much has happened since then.

After Gerard I was published, the Legislature moved quickly to enact SB 327, which amended Labor Code … Continue Reading

California Court of Appeal Upholds On-Duty Meal Period Agreements for Concrete-Mixer Drivers

On November 30, 2016, the California Court of Appeal issued its opinion in Driscoll v. Granite Rock Company. The opinion provides guidance to California employers who enter into on-duty meal period agreements with their employees.

In Driscoll, the trial court had certified a class of approximately 200 concrete-mixer drivers who alleged they were not provided off-duty meal periods pursuant to California law. Those claims proceeded to a bench trial and the trial court found in favor of the employer. The employees then appealed.

The Court of Appeal upheld the employer’s on-duty meal period agreements, noting that the employer’s … Continue Reading

The Third Circuit Adopts Predominant Benefit Test For Meal Periods, Leaving The Ninth Circuit As The Sole Holdout

PostThe Third Circuit Court of Appeals recently joined the chorus of Circuits adopting the pro-employer “predominant benefit test” when weighing the compensability of meal periods under the Fair Labor Standards Act (“FLSA”).  As a result, the Ninth Circuit is the lone Circuit to apply a different standard, opting to follow the U.S. Department of Labor regulations providing that an “employee must be completely relieved from duty” in order for a meal period to be deemed bona fide and thus not compensable.

In Babcock v. Butler County, a putative class action lawsuit, employees at the Butler County prison alleged that … Continue Reading

Meal Periods with Travel Restrictions May Be Compensable

In Naylor v. Securiguard, Inc., the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals held that an employer may be required to compensate employees for meal breaks if the employees are required to spend a significant portion of that period traveling to a required break area.

Facts Black white striped sentry box

Securiguard employees guarded several gates to a Naval air station.  During their shifts, the guards received two scheduled thirty-minute meal breaks.  The guards expressed a desire to eat at their posts, but Securiguard prohibited them from doing so (out of concern that the customer would think they were shirking their security duties).

Accordingly, the guards … Continue Reading

California Court of Appeal Decision Exposes Healthcare Employers to Litigation if They Relied upon Wage Order for Meal Period Waivers

Employers in California – and healthcare employers in particular – have been besieged by wage-hour class actions for more than a decade. They have been sued repeatedly on claims that they have not complied with the terms of Industrial Welfare Commission (“IWC”) Wage Orders. Now, as a result of a new decision from the California Court of Appeal, they may face lawsuits based not on a failure to comply with the language of a Wage Order, but because they in fact relied upon language in a Wage Order. It is a development that may lead many employers to throw up … Continue Reading

The Sixth Circuit Holds That Meal Periods Spent “Doing Exactly What One Might Expect An Off-Duty Employee To Be Doing” Are Not Compensable.

In Ruffin v. MotorCity Casino, the Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals considered whether casino security guards were entitled to be paid for meal periods during which they were required to remain on casino property, monitor two-way radios and respond to emergencies if called to do so.

The District Court for the Eastern District of Michigan had granted summary judgment to the employer based on the conclusion that no reasonable jury could have found the meal periods to be compensable work time.

In affirming the ruling of the District Court, the Sixth Circuit relied on its earlier decision in Hill Continue Reading

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