Joining California and New York, New Jersey has become the third state with a phased-in $15 minimum wage requirement for most employees. On February 4, 2019, Governor Phil Murphy signed into law A15 (“Law”), which raises the state minimum wage rate for employers with six or more employees to $10.00 per hour on July 1, 2019, and then to $11.00 per hour on January 1, 2020. Thereafter, the minimum wage will increase annually on January 1 by $1.00 per hour until it reaches $15.00 per hour on January 1, 2024. The minimum wage hike will phase in at a slower rate for employers with five or fewer employees and for “seasonal employers” (defined below). Thus, the current minimum wage of $8.85 per hour will increase as follows: ­­

Date of Increase in Minimum Wage Rate

Minimum Wage Rate for Employers with 6 or More Employees

Minimum Wage Rate for “Small Employers” (those with 5 or fewer employees) and Seasonal Employers

July 1, 2019

$10.00 $8.85 (no change)

January 1, 2020

$11.00 $10.30

January 1, 2021

$12.00 $11.10

January 1, 2022

$13.00 $11.90
January 1, 2023 $14.00

$12.70

January 1, 2024 $15.00

$13.50

January 1, 2025 $15.00 + inflation adjusted*

$14.30

January 1, 2026 $15.00 + inflation adjusted*

$15.00**

*As a result of a state constitutional amendment passed in 2013, the minimum wage rate after 2024 will increase for this group based on the inflation rate at the time (and the federal minimum wage rate, if higher).

** The Law provides for further annual inflation adjustments to the minimum wage after 2026 for seasonal workers and employees of small employers so that by January 1, 2028, workers in those groups will receive the same minimum wage as employees of larger employers.  …         

Read the full Advisory online.

On January 17, 2019, New Jersey Governor Phil Murphy and legislative leaders announced an agreement to raise New Jersey’s minimum wage to $15 an hour by 2024. Under the agreement, and presuming enactment, effective July 1, 2019, the state’s minimum wage for most workers will increase from $8.85 to $10 an hour; thereafter, it will increase $1 an hour every January 1 until reaching $15 on January 1, 2024.

For seasonal workers and employees of small businesses (i.e., five or fewer workers), the ramp-up to $15 an hour would extend to 2026. For farmworkers, the base minimum wage would increase incrementally to $12.50 by January 1, 2024. Then, a special committee would review to determine whether to raise the farmworkers’ minimum wage to $15 an hour. …

Read the full Advisory online.

On May 3, New Jersey Governor Phil Murphy signed an executive order (“Order”) establishing a Task Force on Employee Misclassification (“Task Force”) to address concerns surrounding the misclassification of employees as independent contractors. The Order estimates that misclassification may deprive New Jersey of over $500 million yearly in tax revenue and deprive workers of employment-related benefits and protections to which they are entitled.

The Task Force’s mandate is to provide advice and recommendations to the Governor’s Office and Executive Branch Departments and agencies on both strategies and actions to fight misclassification, including:

  1. Examining and evaluating existing misclassification enforcement by executive departments and agencies;
  2. Developing best practices by departments and agencies to increase coordination of information and efficient enforcement;
  3. Developing recommendations to foster compliance with the law, including by educating employers, workers, and the public about misclassification; and
  4. Conducting a review of existing law and applicable procedures related to misclassification.

The Task Force will be comprised of at least 12 members, including three representatives from the Department of Labor and Workforce Development; three representatives from the Department of the Treasury; and one representative each from the Department of Law and Public Safety, the Department of Agriculture, the Department of Banking and Insurance, the Department of Human Services, the Department of Transportation, and the Economic Development Authority.

The Order calls for the Task Force to organize and meet as soon as possible to begin its work and is a likely harbinger of increased governmental audits and enforcement actions. Accordingly, the time is ripe for employers to review their policies and practices with respect to consultants and other independent contractors to ensure they meet New Jersey’s stringent ABC Test for classification of independent contractors, which we have previously discussed.

34th Annual Workforce Management Briefing Banner

When:  Thursday, October 15, 2015    8:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m.

Where:  New York Hilton Midtown, 1335 Avenue of the Americas, New York, NY 10019

This year, Epstein Becker Green’s Annual Workforce Management Briefing focuses on the latest developments that impact employers nationwide, featuring senior officials from the U.S. Department of Labor and the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. We will also take a close look at the 25th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act and its growing impact on the workplace.

In addition, we are excited to welcome our keynote speaker Neil Cavuto, Senior Vice President, Managing Editor, and Anchor for both FOX News Channel and FOX Business Network.

Our industry-focused breakout sessions will feature panels composed of Epstein Becker Green attorneys and senior executives from major companies, discussing issues that keep employers awake at night.  From the latest National Labor Relations Board developments to data privacy and security concerns, each workshop will offer insight on how to mitigate risk and avoid costly litigation.

View the full briefing agenda here. Contact Kiirsten Lederer or Elizabeth Gannon for more information and to register.   Seats are limited.