Nancy Gunzenhauser Popper

Effective December 31, 2018, New York State’s salary basis threshold for exempt executive and administrative employees[1] will increase again, as a part of amendments to the minimum wage orders put in place in 2016.[2] Employers must increase the salaries of employees classified as exempt under the executive and administrative exemptions by the end of the year to maintain these exemptions.

The increases to New York’s salary basis threshold for the executive and administrative exemptions will take effect as follows:

Employers in New York City 

  • Large employers (11 or more employees)
    • $1,125.00 per week ($58,500 annually) on and after 12/31/18
  • Small employers (10 or fewer employees)
    • $1,012.50 per week ($52,650 annually) on and after 12/31/18
    • $1,125.00 per week ($58,500 annually) on and after 12/31/19

Employers in Nassau, Suffolk, and Westchester Counties

  • $900.00 per week ($46,800 annually) on and after 12/31/18
  • $975.00 per week ($50,700 annually) on and after 12/31/19
  • $1,050.00 per week ($54,600 annually) on and after 12/31/20
  • $1,125.00 per week ($58,500 annually) on and after 12/31/21

Employers Outside of New York City and Nassau, Suffolk, and Westchester Counties

  • $832.00 per week ($43,264  annually) on and after 12/31/18
  • $885.00 per week ($46,020 annually) on and after 12/31/19
  • $937.50 per week ($48,750 annually) on and after 12/31/20

What New York Employers Should Do Now

  • Review executive and administrative exempt positions in New York State with salaries below the stated thresholds to determine whether (a) the employee’s salary should be increased or (b) the employee’s position should be reclassified as non-exempt.
    • For executive and administrative employees remaining exempt, increase their salaries to the new threshold based on their primary work location as of the December 31, 2018, effective date.
    • For employees reclassified to non-exempt, ensure that all of their work time is accurately recorded as of December 31, 2018.
  • Consider establishing procedures to track and update the weekly salaries for employees who work in different locations within New York State.
  • Conduct a regular review of primary duties tests for the executive, administrative, and professional exemptions because meeting the salary threshold alone does not confer exempt status upon employees.

Download a PDF of this Advisory.

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[1] New York law does not contain a salary threshold for employees who meet the duties requirements of the professional exemption.

[2] See Epstein Becker Green’s prior Act Now Advisory titled “New York State Department of Labor Implements New Salary Basis Thresholds for Exempt Employees.”

In 2018, we have seen important new wage and hour developments unfolding on a seemingly weekly basis. To help you stay up to date and out of the crosshairs of the plaintiffs’ bar, we invite you to join Epstein Becker Green’s Employment, Labor & Workforce Management Webinar Series presentation for September. Presented by our Wage and Hour practice group, this webinar will focus on wage and hour developments affecting the hospitality and home health care industries, although much of the information will also be of interest to employers in other industries.

With an eye toward the hospitality industry, the key issues we plan to cover include:

  • New statutory and regulatory changes affecting tip pooling and sharing, as well as required notice to employees
  • Litigation risks presented by service charges
  • New York’s requirements concerning spread-of-hours and call-in pay

For home health care businesses, we will focus on these topics:

  • The emerging case law on 24-hour sleep time
  • How to track hours worked, especially for employees previously viewed as exempt
  • Whether to classify workers as “employees” or “independent contractors”

Thursday, September 13, 2018

1:00 p.m. – 2:30 p.m. ET

Register for this complimentary webinar today!

Our colleagues , Eric I. Emanuelson, Jr. at Epstein Becker Green have a post on the Retail Labor and Employment Law blog that will be of interest to our readers: “Massachusetts “Grand Bargain” Makes Changes to Blue Laws for Retailers.”

Following is an excerpt:

A legislative bargain requires give-and-take from all stakeholders. On June 28, 2018, Massachusetts Governor Baker signed House Bill 4640, “An Act Relative to Minimum Wage, Paid Family Medical Leave, and the Sales Tax Holiday” (the “Act”). This “grand bargain” gradually raises the minimum wage, provides for paid family and medical leave, makes permanent the Commonwealth’s annual tax holiday, and phases out Sunday and holiday premium pay requirements. While Massachusetts employers must now adjust to an increased minimum wage and new paid family medical leave program, retailers with eight or more employees may see those costs mitigated by the gradual elimination of Sunday and holiday premium pay mandates. …

Read the full post here.

*Eric I. Emanuelson, Jr., is a 2018 Summer Associate at Epstein Becker Green.

A number of states and localities are about to implement mid-year hikes in the minimum wage. Below is a summary of the minimum wage increases (and related tipped minimum wage requirements, where applicable) that go into effect on July 1, 2018.

Current New
State Special Categories Minimum Wage Tipped Minimum Wage Minimum Wage Tipped Minimum Wage
Maryland $9.25 $3.63 $10.10 N/A
Nevada Employees with qualified

health benefits

$7.25 N/A
Employees without

health benefits

$8.25 N/A
Oregon General $10.25 $10.75
Urban (Portland Metro Urban Growth Area) $11.25 $12.00
Rural (Nonurban) $10.00 $10.50
Washington, D.C. $12.50 $3.33 $13.25 $3.89

 

Current New
Locality Categories Minimum Wage Tipped Minimum Wage Minimum Wage Tipped Minimum Wage
CA          
Belmont, CA N/A $12.50
Emeryville, CA 56 or more employees $15.20 $15.69
55 or fewer employees $14.00 $15.00
Los Angeles, CA (City) 26 or more employees $12.00 $13.25  
25 or fewer employees $10.50 $12.00  
Los Angeles, CA (County) Unincorporated areas of LA County, 26 or more employees $12.00 $13.25  
Unincorporated areas of LA County, 25 or fewer employees $10.50 $12.00  
Malibu, CA 26 or more employees $12.00 $13.25  
25 or fewer employees $10.50 $12.00  
Milpitas, CA $12.00 $13.50  
Pasadena, CA 26 or more employees $12.00 $13.25  
25 or fewer employees $10.50 $12.00  
San Francisco, CA Generally $14.00 $15.00  
Government-supported employees $12.87 $13.27  
San Leandro, CA $12.00 $13.00  
Santa Monica, CA 26 or more employees $12.00 $13.25  
25 or fewer employees $10.50 $12.00  
IL  
Chicago, IL $11.00 $6.10 $12.00 $6.25
Cook County, IL $10.00 $4.95 $11.00 $5.10
ME          
Portland, ME $10.68 $5.00 $10.90 N/A
MD
Montgomery County, MD 51 or more employees $11.50 $4.00 $12.25 N/A
11-50 employees, and provides certain home health services or is tax-exempt under 501(c)(3) $11.50 $4.00 $12.00 N/A
10 or fewer employees $11.50 $4.00 $12.00 N/A
MN
Minneapolis, MN 101 or more employees $10.00 $11.25
100 or fewer employees N/A N/A

This post was written with assistance from John W. Milani, a 2018 Summer Associate at Epstein Becker Green.

In 2017, a great many states and localities passed laws increasing minimum wages beginning on January 1, 2018. (Some passed laws that will be effective on July 1, 2018 or other dates.)

Below is a summary of the minimum wage updates (and related tipped minimum wage requirements, where applicable) that go into effect on January 1, 2018, unless otherwise indicated.

Current New
State Categories Minimum Wage Tipped Minimum Wage Minimum Wage Tipped Minimum Wage
Alaska $9.80 $9.84
Arizona $10.00 $7.00 $10.50 $7.50
California
26 or more employees $10.50 $11.00
25 or fewer employees $10.00 $10.50
Colorado $9.30 $6.28 $10.20 $7.18
Florida $8.10 $5.08 $8.25 $5.23
Hawaii $9.25 $8.50 $10.10 $9.35
Maine $9.00 $5.00 $10.00 $5.00
Michigan $8.90 $3.38 $9.25 $3.52
Minnesota
Large employer (annual gross revenue of $500,000 or more) $9.50 $9.65
Small employer (annual gross revenue of less than $500,000) $7.75 $7.87
Missouri $7.70 $3.85 $7.85 $3.925
Montana $8.15 $8.30
New Jersey $8.44 $6.31 $8.60 $6.47
New York (effective December 31, 2017)
NYC – more than 10 employees $11.00 $7.50* $13.00 $8.70
NYC – 10 or fewer employees $10.50 $7.50 $12.00 $8.00
Nassau, Suffolk, & Westchester Counties $10.00 $7.50 $11.00 $7.50
Remainder of State $9.70 $7.50 $10.40 $7.50
Ohio $8.15 $4.08 $8.30 $4.15
Rhode Island $9.60 $3.89 $10.10 $3.89
South Dakota $8.65 $4.325 $8.85 $4.425
Vermont $10.00 $5.00 $10.50 $5.25
Washington $11.00 $11.50

*Different rules apply based on certain industries, such as for food service, fast food (within New York City), and hospitality industries.

Current New
Location Categories Minimum Wage Tipped Minimum Wage Minimum Wage Tipped Minimum Wage
Arizona          
Flagstaff, AZ $10.50 $11.00
California          
Cupertino, CA $12.00 $13.50  
El Cerrito, CA $12.25 $13.60  
Los Altos, CA $12.00 $13.50  
Milpitas, CA $11.00 $12.00  
Mountain View, CA $13.00 $15.00  
Oakland, CA $12.86 $13.23  
Palo Alto, CA $12.00 $13.50  
Richmond, CA $12.30 $13.41  
Sacramento, CA 40 or more employees $10.50 $11.00  
San Jose, CA $12.00 $13.50  
San Mateo, CA  
501(c)(3) non-profit $10.50 $12.00  
Other businesses $12.00 $13.50  
Santa Clara, CA $11.10 $13.00  
Sunnyvale, CA $13.00 $15.00  
Maine          
Bangor, ME $8.25 $4.125 $9.00 $4.50
New Mexico          
Albuquerque, NM
No healthcare provided $8.80 $5.30 $8.95 $5.35
Health care provided $7.80 $5.30 $7.95 $5.35
Bernalillo County $8.70 $2.13 $8.85 $2.13
Washington          
Seattle, WA  
Small employer (500 or fewer employees) – without tips and/or medical benefits $13.00 $14.00  
Small employer (500 or fewer employees) – with tips and/or medical benefits $11.00 $11.50  
Large employer (501 or more employees) – without medical benefits $15.00 $15.45  
Large employer (501 or more employees) – with medical benefits $13.50 $15.00  
Tacoma, WA $11.15 $12.00