The New York State Department of Labor (“NYSDOL”) recently announced that it would no longer pursue employee scheduling regulations concerning “call-in” (or “on-call”) pay and other so-called predictive scheduling matters. As we previously reported, the proposed regulations, if adopted, would have required most employers in New York State to provide call-in pay under various

By Kara M. Maciel

As Hurricane Irene is moving up the East Coast and threatening states from North Carolina, Virginia, Maryland, New Jersey, New York and Massachusetts, employers should refresh themselves on the wage and hour issues arising from the possibility of missed work days in the wake of the storm.

A few brief points

There is a substantial difference between the definition of “hours worked” adopted by the California Division of Labor Standards Enforcement (“DLSE”) and that used by the Department of Labor (“DOL”) under the FLSA. Under California law, it is generally only necessary that the worker be subject to the “control of the employer” or “all the time the employee is suffered or permitted to work” in order to be entitled to pay. These two phrases operate independently of each other, so that if time falls into either category, it must be counted as hours worked.
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