The New York State Department of Labor (“NYSDOL”) recently announced that it would no longer pursue employee scheduling regulations concerning “call-in” (or “on-call”) pay and other so-called predictive scheduling matters. As we previously reported, the proposed regulations, if adopted, would have required most employers in New York State to provide call-in pay under various circumstances, even though the employee had not actually worked or, in some situations, had not even reported to work.

Proposed Regulations

The NYSDOL’s proposed regulations had been in the works for several years. As recently as December 2018, the NYSDOL published revised proposed regulations for which they sought the public’s comments. Among other measures, the revised proposed rules would have required covered employers to provide “call-in pay” ranging from two to four hours at the minimum wage rate if the employer (i) failed to provide employees with 14 days’ notice of either their scheduled work shift or the cancellation of their scheduled work shift, (ii) required an employee to work “on-call” or to call in up to 72 hours ahead of their potential next shift, or (iii) decided to send a non-exempt employee home after the employee was instructed to report to work. …

Read the full Advisory online.